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Flower Spotlight: Anemone

Anemones, not to be confused with the sea creatures, are a mysterious flower with many meanings. You won’t find them growing in the ocean, but they can be found all across the globe. There are more than 100 different varieties and they come in many different colors.  [Read more…]

Your Favorite Flowers That Are Acutally Shrubs

Sure, all flowers grow from the ground, but many of your favorites come from shrubs and aren’t your standard annuals or perennials. These flowering shrubs can be a highlight to your landscape as well as your flower arrangements. [Read more…]

Ask the Expert: What’s this mystery plant?

“Can you identify this plant? These have sprouted without intervention and they are nice even without the beautiful blossom. I would appreciate your help.” – Larry L.

Photos of Larry’s blackberry lily

This is an Iris domestica, formerly Belamcanda chinensis, commonly known as a blackberry lily or leopard lily. These are a relative of the iris and have leaves similar to an iris with a flower that resembles a lily. They enjoy full sun, are relatively low maintenance and drought tolerant. They tend to be a short-lived perennial but will self-seed with the proper conditions.

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Annuals VS Perennials: What’s the Difference?

What do annuals and perennials have to do with flowers from your florist? Understanding the difference between the two will help explain why some of your favorite flowers are more easily found during some parts of the year, and why some flowers are almost always available. [Read more…]

More Than Pretty Blooms

MORE THAN PRETTY BLOOMS BLOG

Often times we simply just look at flowers.  We admire their beauty and grace, and never stop to think of what more they might be able to offer.  Many flowers that are commonly found in bouquets are also edible or have been used for medicinal purposes*.  Sometimes they are mistaken for weeds or wildflowers. These flowers are frequently found in flower beds as well as florists’ shops.  

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Feverfew
Feverfew is known by many names and is a relative of the chrysanthemum.  This delicate, white flower looks similar to a daisy and may be mistaken for a common weed.  They grow in barren places outdoors, but can also be grown indoors or found in gardens.  They can become invasive.  

Feverfew has been used for hundreds of years to treat migraines.  The leaves can be eaten directly, but are said to be bitter or can be brewed into a tea.  Feverfew also has anti-inflammatory properties and has been used to treat arthritis, allergies, and insect bites.

[Read more…]

Flower Spotlight: Stargazer Lily

Bold, beautiful, dramatic! These are just a few characteristics of the stunning Stargazer lily. Their exquisite scent and elegant look make them the perfect gift for any occasion! Want to learn more about this amazing bloom? Keep reading!

Symbolism & Origins
Stargazer lilies are a combination of Oriental and Asiatic lilies. They were named by Leslie Woodruff, a lily grower and breeder, in reference to the way the blooms of this flower point towards the sky. Stargazers have only been around for a couple of decades but have quickly gained popularity.

Stargazers are believed to symbolize innocence and purity but the meaning changes with the color of the flower. For example, a pink stargazer lily symbolizes prosperity and abundance. Yellow stargazers express joy and of course, white stargazers signify purity and innocence. Other meanings for this good-looking flower are success and determination, commitment, passion and the fulfillment of dreams.

To Consider
This stunning bloom is highly toxic to cats. If eaten, they can experience vomiting, kidney failure, lethargy and even death. Make sure not to leave this stunning bloom near children or pets!

Availability
Stargazers bloom from early summer through mid summer and can last from 14 to 20 days. They need full sun exposure, nutrient soil and well maintained water levels. This stunning flower comes in white, pink and yellow. They are perfect for birthdays and anniversaries, specifically 30th year anniversaries since they too symbolize the everlasting love between the couple. They are the ideal gift to say “I’m sorry” and also to express sympathy.

Stargazer lilies are not only beautiful but also packed with meaning! Head to your local florist and surprise the ones you love most with the world’s most elegant bloom!

Flower Spotlight: Daffodils

Spring marks the rebirth of nature! It is the season in which we see bright colored blooms, like daffodils, come to life once again. Let’s start the season by learning more about the beautiful flower of March!

Origins and Symbolism
Daffodils are native to North America, the Middle East and the Mediterranean region. They are some of the first flowers to bloom in spring, therefore symbolize “rebirth.” Other meanings are uncertainty, respect, unrequited love, regard, chivalry, modesty and faithfulness.

There is a Greek myth that talks about a beautiful boy named Narcissus. As you may know or for those who don’t, narcissus is another name widely used for this flower instead of daffodil. The myth says that this boy was so in love with himself that he just didn’t care about anyone else, he was indifferent to their emotions. The rejection to connect with people angered the gods, so they cursed him to one day fall in love and not have that love returned. The curse was fulfilled when one day, Narcissus, walked by a pool and unexpectedly saw an image looking back at him. It was his own reflection he saw but failed to recognize it. Lost in grief for not being able to fulfill his love, it’s been said, Narcissus laid next to the pool and “disappeared into the underworld.” People looked for him but all they found was a yellow flower, a daffodil, next to the pool where he last laid.

To Consider
The ASPCA says that daffodils are toxic to dogs, cats and horses. According to them the bulbs are the most poisonous part. If ingested by any of your pets they could cause vomit, diarrhea, low blood pressure and even convulsions.

Availability
Daffodils are most commonly found in the color yellow, other varieties have accents in colors white, lime green, pink and orange. They make beautiful hand-tied bouquets! Put some daffodils in a clear glass vase with other “spring looking” flowers to make a beautiful arrangement to brighten your home. The narcissus bloom usually grows from March to May, take advantage of the season and get your hands on this beauty!

Visit your local florist, you will find not only daffodils but many more astonishing blooms! If undecided as to what arrangement or flower to gift, ask for advice! The best part of dealing with your local florist is the personalized attention.  Check out our Bloomin’ Blog for more tips and ideas!

Flower Spotlight: Carnations

Today we will focus on January’s flower. You will learn about the origins of carnations, their meaning and other important facts about this beautiful bloom. Ready to fall in love with this flower? Keep on reading…

Origins & Symbolism

Dianthus Caryophyllus, better known as Carnation, has been cultivated for over 2,000 years in Europe and Asia. The name carnation derives from the words “coronation” or “corone” in reference to floral garlands used in ancient Greek ceremonial events. Greek botanist Theophrastus named the flower “Dianthus” meaning “flower of the gods.”

Carnation is the official Mother’s Day bloom. Anna Marie Jarvis, founder of this holiday, selected the flower in tribute to her own mother. They often symbolize fascination and distinction, but depending on the color of the bloom, it takes different meanings. Red means admiration and love, dark red shows deep love and affection, white equals purity and good luck, pink symbolizes gratitude and when striped they often signify refusal.

To Consider

There are over 300 species of carnations known to date, most of which bloom in full sunlight and well-drained soil. According to The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), carnations can be toxic to cats and dogs. If at all possible, try to keep your four-legged friends away from this astonishing flower. If they accidentally ingest this bloom, contact your local veterinary facility.

Availability

Carnations can be found in almost every color of the rainbow! They are classified as edible flowers, for humans, and are a popular choice for decorating cakes and other pastries. Make sure, if you will be eating this or any other flower classified as edible, to use only organically grown blooms. This is to prevent pesticides or any other harmful products from entering your system. Not too sure about eating the petals of carnations? Add this delicate flower in combination with other blooms, or by itself, to a desired vase. Perfect for weddings, birthdays and other events. You will see that carnations create beautiful arrangements, centerpieces and other decorative pieces!

Head to your local florist and delight yourself or loved ones with the beauty of this bloom!

Flower Spotlight: Holly

One plant with a lot of holiday meaning is the llex disambiguation or, otherwise known as holly. Here’s a brief history to learn more about this evergreen tree.

Origins & Symbolism

Holly is a tree member of the Aquifoliaceae family and the only living genus. Holly is native to parts of central and southern Europe, but can be found in many different parts around the world. The holly tree is known as “Christ’s Thorn” in the northern countries of Europe. It is said that “the prickly leaves represent the crown of thorns that Jesus wore when he was crucified. The berries are the drops of blood that were shed by Jesus because of the thorns.”

To Consider

The leaves of holly have no taste or odor and, although berries are sometimes eaten by birds, they can be very dangerous when ingested by humans and pets. The leaves are pointy, resembling thorns, alternating directions upwards and downwards with a leathery texture that makes them very durable.

Availability

Holly can be found all year long, but is most commonly used in flower arrangements, wreaths and centerpieces during the month of December. The leaves are very long lasting which makes them perfect for incorporating in any type of arrangement or home decor pieces.

Make sure to incorporate this evergreen tree into your Christmas and New Year’s festivities. Head to your local florist for your beautiful holly arrangement!

Flower Spotlight: Craspedia Globosa

This month, we wanted to focus on a bloom that is not your “ordinary flower.” From fresh bouquets to long-lasting dry arrangements, this flower does it all! Learn more about craspedia globosa, the golden drumstick.

Origin & Symbolism

Craspedia globosa, most commonly known as “billy button” or “drumstick,” is a form of daisy that belongs to the Asteraceae family. Craspedia is a wildflower grown in Tasmania, New Zealand and Australia. The name derived from the Greek word “kraspedon,” which means “fringed edge,” globosa meaning “sperical shaped” in reference to the shape of the flower.

Billy buttons often signify good health, but in modern day it is said to “express the feeling that the receiver lights up the sender’s world.”

Availability

Drumsticks are available all year round! They are originally yellow, but some suppliers may offer dyed blooms in colors red, orange and green. The golden bloom can be mixed with succulents to create rustic bouquets with white daisies and wild flowers. They are also perfect as a little touch to brighten up a room!

Not too sure about this flower? Head to your local florist and ask for their ideas on how to incorporate this interesting bloom into an arrangement!