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What Kind of Flower Is This?

Ask The Plant Expert:

Someone gave my wife this plant. Her friend called it a “Mari lilly.” I cannot find any information at all about it. There are always four cone-shaped bright red flowers on each stalk. There are six petals each. There may be several stalks of flowers each season. The leaves grow out of the base only. – Paul

Flower Shop Network Plant Expert Reply:

Paul, looks like you have an Hippeastrum on your hands, AKA Amaryllis.

We have a great article about amaryllis that explains the name:

At one time, hundreds of plants were labeled Amaryllis from both the new and old world. After a closer look, it was understood that they actually are not from the same genus at all. The name Amaryllis now is used to describe plants from the old world, namely Africa. Plants from the new world are labled Hippeastrum. Currently, there are only two species in the true, Amaryllis genus; the most famous of these is Amaryllis belladonna. The horticultural trade has made little efforts to correct the mislabeled Amaryllis to Hippeastrum, and even if they did, it probably would do very little good.

Read more about this beautiful flower in Amaryllis: The Show-Stopping Diva of Houseplants

In Loving Memory of Amaryllis

Amaryllis | Hippeastrum

Today’s exceptional post was shared with us by Olivia Nicholas, a writer and a busy mom. She is always happy to share her passion for life and experiences through her work.

I’ve never been sure what made me remember Grandmother’s amaryllis obsession when autumn first began to turn the leaves this year. It could have been a flash of scarlet fabric seen from the corner of my eye, or maybe a stately bell-shaped flower struggling to carry on its existence despite the slow creep of cold weather. Whatever the case, I found myself driving to the local greenhouse one day instead of going directly home as I usually did after work. The clerk was very helpful, directing me to the perennial bulb section and setting me up with flower pots, soil, and everything else necessary to cultivate and continue my grandmother’s flower legacy. Excited, I got to work as soon as I got home.

The feel of the amaryllis bulbs in my hand and the rich smell of potting soil evoked even more memories of planting flowers at my grandparents’ home. Like my grandmother herself, amaryllis is a winter beauty, as dainty and gorgeous as it is tough and hardy; both thrive in cold weather and wilt in the heat. In my mind, the two of them had always been synonymous, especially since my grandmother was also called Amaryllis.

[Read more…]

Amaryllis: The Show-Stopping Diva of Houseplants

The Amaryllis is quickly becoming a favorite, trendy houseplant for Christmas. Rivaling the larger, more traditional poinsettias. But there is far more to the Amaryllis than just being a Christmas decoration. Read all about this fascinating flower in this article!

AMARYLLIS/ HIPPEASTRUM

Use: Flower

Type: Bulbous Perennials

Height: 9-16″

Name Meaning: Pride, Radiant Beauty

GROWING

Requirements: moderately fertile, well-drained soil. Full sun to partial shade.

Makes a great houseplant.

DESIGNING

Blossom Size: 3-8″ tall

Texture: Waxy

Fragrance: Light, sweet scent

Silhouette: Trumpet

Vase Life: 7-10 Days

Colors: Solid and Bi colors. Mostly pinks, whites, or purples

Bloom Season: Fall

Flowers Available: Year Round, Peaks October through May

ABOUT AMARYLLIS/ HIPPEASTRUM

Mistaken Identity At one time, hundreds of plants were labeled Amaryllis from both the new and old world. After a closer look, it was understood that they actually are not from the same genus at all. The name Amaryllis now is used to describe plants from the old world, namely Africa. Plants from the new world are labeled Hippeastrum. Currently, there are only two species in the true, Amaryllis genus; the most famous of these is Amaryllis belladonna. The horticultural trade has made little efforts to correct the mislabeled Amaryllis to Hippeastrum, and even if they did, it probably would do very little good.

Amaryllis | Hippeastrum

Hip To Be Hippeastrum. Most of the commercially available forms of Amaryllis are actually Hippeastrum. These plants are native to Central and South America. There are over 50 species and hundreds of different cultivars available. They are an increasingly popular bulb for indoor growing because of their sleek style and long bloom time.

Hippeastrum is Greek for horseman’s star (knight’s star), because of the resemblance to the morning star weapon. You know, the big, spiky ball on the end of a chain with a club. Who would have thought such a delicate beauty could be named after a medieval weapon?

The Dutch were the first to cultivate the Hippeastrum (from the Americas)  in Europe in the 18th Century. But it was the emergence of Hippeastrum papilio that caused these flowers to skyrocket in popularity. H. papilio is a unique beauty; it combines beautiful color with unique stripes. This allowed for tons of new varieties with striking color variations.

UP-AND-COMING CUT FLOWER FAVORITE

Florists everywhere are loving the Amaryllis right now. They have a fantastic vase life and an unrivaled silhouette. They look great in big bunches — fantastic for Christmas centerpieces.

Amaryllis Christmas Centerpieces

Probably the favorite use for Amaryllis in floral design, is [Read more…]

Hanakotoba: The Japanese Language of Flowers

"Noble Wealth"

"Noble Wealth"

In the Victorian Era, flowers were used as a means of communication. Each flower had it’s own, particular meaning and bouquets were used to send coded messages. People today still send flowers chosen specifically for their flower meanings.

Not only did the Western world have its own coded, flower language, the East had one as well— Hanakotoba, the Japanese language of flowers. Although, obviously not as popular today as it once was, Hanakotoba is still used in many Japanese movies and animations.

Kanji

English

Meaning

アマリリス Amaryllis Shy
アネモネ Anemone (white) Sincere
椿 Camellia (red) In Love
椿 Camellia (yellow) Longing
椿 Camellia (white) Waiting
カーネーション Carnation Passion
Cherry Blossom Kind/Gentle
黄菊 Chrysanthemum (yellow) Imperial/Elegant
白菊 Chrysanthemum (white) Truth/Self-Esteem
水仙 Daffodil Respect
天竺牡丹 Dahlia Good Taste
雛菊 Daisy Faith
勿忘草 Forget-Me-Not True Love
フリージア Freesia Immaculate
梔子 Gardenia Secret Love/Pure
紫陽花 Hydrangea Pride
アイリス / 菖蒲 Iris Noble Heart/Good News
白百合 Lily (white) Purity
百合 Lily of the Valley Sweet/Promise of Happiness
鬼百合 Tiger Lily Wealth
マグノリア Magnolia Natural/Love For Nature
雛芥子 Poppy Comfort
紅薔薇 Rose (red) Love/In Love
薔薇 Rose (white) Innocence/Devotion
桃色薔薇 Rose (pink) Trust/Confidence
黄色薔薇 Rose (yellow) Noble
チューリップ Tulip Charity/Trust

Contact your local florist today and ask for an arrangement using your favorite Hanakotoba flower meanings.

This post is brought to you by local Honolulu Hawaii Florists.
Not in Honolulu? No worries, use Flower Shop Network’s handy directory of local florists to find a florist near you!

Using Amaryllis In A Wedding Bouquet

Ask the Expert: what flower/s goes best with amaryllis?
i am getting married in February, i wanted a bouquete of amaryllis (white i think) and i would like to know what other flower or flowers would go well with them, thank you Dilaila

Flower Shop Network‘s Plant Expert Reply:

White amaryllis are certainly beautiful flowers.

Amaryllis Wedding Bouquet with Tulips Designed by Seattle Flowers


I have seen a wedding bouquet with white amaryllis and tulips which was designed by Seattle Flowers. This hand-tied bouquet used a beautiful satin ribbon embellished with pearls.

Keep in mind amaryllis stems are very thick and a hand-tied bouquet is most likely the only option.

Since the amaryllis will be the focal point of the bouquet, you  might use a light, airy foliage instead of flowers. This way the bridal bouquet will be luscious instead of over-whelming. If you including other flowers, make sure you choose flowers with the same texture like Roses, tulips or orchids.  Your wedding florist will be able to show you a variety of flowers that will work with the amaryllis. They will also be able to check the availability of amaryllis in February.

Typically amaryllis are only available during the Christmas season.  Your wedding florist will be able to check the availability of amaryllis in February.  If the amaryllis is unavailable, you might consider ‘Casa Blanca’ lilies. They will give you the same beautiful look.

If you are searching for wedding bouquets ideas, check out the bridal bouquets pictures on Wedding and Party Network.

This wedding flower question was brought to you by local Seattle Florists.

Did You Know That There Are Zodiac Flowers For Aries?

If you caught last year’s blog about Aries zodiac flowers, this will be a great reminder. If you missed that post, you’re in for a real treat!

"Timeless Tulips Bouquet" of Flowers

"Timeless Tulips Bouquet" of Flowers

Zodiac or astrological flowers are usually sent to someone with a birthday that falls under a particular zodiac sign. These are not flowers that florists stand over like shamans. They have no tom foolery attached. They simply represent the same general qualities that people possess who are born within that time frame. For April, these flowers are tulips, red roses, and amaryllis.

I’m sure you’re wondering (as I did at first) what tulips, red roses, and amaryllis have to do with the Aries zodiac sign. There are a few qualities that Aries are said to possess that can easily be seen in these flowers. For example, Aries are generally innovative people full of ideas and energy. They put the “get up and go” in most situations. This makes sense since Aries is the first sign in the zodiac. Aries tend to be daring, impulsive, desire first place or the most attention and want to work without restriction. Here’s what their astrological flowers have in common:

"Loving Embrace" Arrangement with Roses

"Loving Embrace" Arrangement with Roses

Tulips: Tulips are the perfect zodiac flowers for Aries because they are beautiful, full of charm, and are second to none in many arrangements. They stand out above the crowd with a stunning simplicity that can’t be matched.

Red Roses: Ah, the truest signs of romance. Red roses arrangements are sent for many occasions. Whatever that event may be, it’s almost always the sight of the red roses that gets the night up and running. They conjure up visions of romantic events. They’re the dreamer’s flower. They’re also great for many different occasions which goes hand in hand with the Aries tendency to start many projects.

Amaryllis: Absolutely gorgeous amaryllis are a fiery flower that couldn’t be more perfectly placed with another zodiac sign. Aries is the god of war, i.e. a very fiery character that lives in the moment with a fierce intensity. People falling under the Aries sign are said to have these characteristics, however sublimated. For the fiery Aries in your life, there is no better addition to a birthday flower arrangement than amaryllis.

Where To Find Plant Wholesalers In California

Ask The Expert: Can anyone suggest plant wholesalers in CA? I have a gift shop in a small community and cannot buy 1000’s of plants, but I am the sole provider to my community. At present, I am looking for Christmas plants such as poinsettias, zygos and amaryllis.

Thank you Deborah

Amaryllis: How To Get It To Bloom

Ask the Expert: How to get amaryllis to bloom again?

 

Flower Shop Network’s Plant Expert Reply: Although many people have success with Amaryllis bulbs, getting them to re-bloom is a long process. This is not a flower with a quick bloom turn-around. Usually Amaryllis will bloom only once a season, however they do bloom every year.

At our greenhouse, neglect is our course of action. If we have any Amaryllis left after the season, we cut the spent flower off the stalk and let the stem start to wilt. When the stem starts to sag, we will cut the stem off at the base of the bulb. We let the leaves grow, watering every couple of weeks and fertilizing every 6 to 7 weeks. We place the potted amaryllis in the back of a greenhouse that has some shade from the hot summer sun.

We don’t fertilize the Amaryllis after July 31st. Depending on when we want it to bloom, we stop watering it completely and cut off the foliage about 10 to 12 weeks before the desired blooming date. This encourages the plant to produce a bloom stalk. As soon as a bloom stalk forms, we begin watering and fertilizing the Amaryllis. We then place the potted amaryllis in a bright place (no direct sunlight is needed). We turn the pot every few days to encourage a straight bloom stalk. From this point it doesn’t take long to see the blooms.