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Flower Spotlight: Hydrangea

With their blooming poms and beautiful colors, hydrangeas are a popular choice for gardeners and florists alike. They’re gorgeous in a garden and make a great addition to flower arrangements. Before you send them, find out more about the history and meanings behind hydrangeas in this month’s Flower Spotlight. [Read more…]

Flower Spotlight: Gladiolus

Gladioli plants produce beautiful, 3-foot flower spikes, covered with orchid-like blooms. They stand beautifully in vases and are equally beautiful in containers and perennial gardens. [Read more…]

Flower Spotlight: Calla Lily

This month, we’re putting the spotlight on the calla lily! This gorgeous flower has become a staple of wedding season, but it’s a beautiful choice for any occasion. [Read more…]

Flower Spotlight: Laceleaf

 

The Laceleaf, also referred to as Anthurium or Flamingo Flower, is a tropical plant that produces a heart-shaped bloom with an inner spike called a spadix. This plant can adapt to almost any environment and produces flowers all year round, which is why it holds the universal symbol for hospitality and abundance. [Read more…]

Flower Spotlight: Pansy

The beloved pansy is a charming little bloom known for its tri-color look. It’s meaning represents loving thoughts and the flower was used in Victorian England for secret courting. Potential romantic partners would communicate their interest with some pansies wrapped in a doily. [Read more…]

Flower Spotlight: Anemone

Anemones, not to be confused with the sea creatures, are a mysterious flower with many meanings. You won’t find them growing in the ocean, but they can be found all across the globe. There are more than 100 different varieties and they come in many different colors.  [Read more…]

Your Favorite Flowers That Are Acutally Shrubs

Sure, all flowers grow from the ground, but many of your favorites come from shrubs and aren’t your standard annuals or perennials. These flowering shrubs can be a highlight to your landscape as well as your flower arrangements. [Read more…]

Ask the Expert: What’s this mystery plant?

“Can you identify this plant? These have sprouted without intervention and they are nice even without the beautiful blossom. I would appreciate your help.” – Larry L.

Photos of Larry’s blackberry lily

This is an Iris domestica, formerly Belamcanda chinensis, commonly known as a blackberry lily or leopard lily. These are a relative of the iris and have leaves similar to an iris with a flower that resembles a lily. They enjoy full sun, are relatively low maintenance and drought tolerant. They tend to be a short-lived perennial but will self-seed with the proper conditions.

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Annuals VS Perennials: What’s the Difference?

What do annuals and perennials have to do with flowers from your florist? Understanding the difference between the two will help explain why some of your favorite flowers are more easily found during some parts of the year, and why some flowers are almost always available. [Read more…]

More Than Pretty Blooms

MORE THAN PRETTY BLOOMS BLOG

Often times we simply just look at flowers.  We admire their beauty and grace, and never stop to think of what more they might be able to offer.  Many flowers that are commonly found in bouquets are also edible or have been used for medicinal purposes*.  Sometimes they are mistaken for weeds or wildflowers. These flowers are frequently found in flower beds as well as florists’ shops.  

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Feverfew
Feverfew is known by many names and is a relative of the chrysanthemum.  This delicate, white flower looks similar to a daisy and may be mistaken for a common weed.  They grow in barren places outdoors, but can also be grown indoors or found in gardens.  They can become invasive.  

Feverfew has been used for hundreds of years to treat migraines.  The leaves can be eaten directly, but are said to be bitter or can be brewed into a tea.  Feverfew also has anti-inflammatory properties and has been used to treat arthritis, allergies, and insect bites.

[Read more…]