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To Pot Or Not To Pot New Hydrangeas?

Potted Hydrangea

Ask The Expert: I received 2 new hydrangeas for Mother’s Day, from a nursery, not foil wrapped.  They are both large.  I have one other one that was foil wrapped that I have potted and is now flowering (after 20 months).  I live in San Antonio, TX, which is hot and dry.  I want to know what would be the best option for these new hydrangeas — to plant them or pot them in probably a 15-20 gallon pot each. I would keep them in is partial shade – late afternoon sun, which has been good for my other older hydrangea.  Do you have any suggestions on these new ones and what kind of pots, soil, etc?

Thanks a bunch,
Pam

Flower Shop Network Plant Expert Reply: Pam,

Since you have one hydrangea that is doing well, I would plant the new ones the same way. Hydrangeas typically prefer a well-drained soil with some sun protect in very hot climates. Different varities of hydrangeas can tolerate sun better than others.

For example: the oakleaf hydrangea prefers a shady area where as the PeeGee hydrangea like the sun.

In Texas, it is best to plant your hydrangeas in rich loamy soil with an eastern or northern exposure (some shade protection could be beneficial, but it will still need a fair amount of sunshine). Make sure to mulch your hydrangeas well to help retain the soil moisture.

I hope this information is helpful. Please let me know if I can Help You with anything else.

Comments

  1. Christa Carter Champion says:

    I need help!
    I bought a plethora of multi colored hydrangeas. took them home and about a week later
    I planted them in Miracle Grow (blue bag) soil. All the blooms immediately turned green!
    What did I do wrong?

  2. Jamie Woods says:

    Christa,
    It is not unusual for hydrangea blooms to turn green. In fact, it is a normal part of their aging process. It’s possible that the fertilizer in your potting soil caused this to occur more rapidly.

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